Why do we yawn

Even animals and unborn babies in the womb yawn. Yawning is always associated with boredom, tiredness, stress, overwork, but the truth is that we may yawn even when we are about to become active. That’s why we yawn when we wake up.

Why do we yawn?

Why do we yawn?

Why do we yawn?

The actual cause of yawning remains a mystery and there are multiple theories attempting to explain why we yawn. Experiments with oxygen masks have shown that the theory humans yawn when in need of oxygen is incorrect. In fact, the amount of oxygen intake is lesser while yawning. Another theory explains that yawning is our body’s way of controlling brain temperature. One more theory explains that we yawn to stretch our muscles.

More than half of the people who hear or see others yawn will yawn, so yawning is really infectious. People who find it easy to empathize with others are more likely to be affected.

Some interesting facts about yawning:

– First yawn for a baby can happen in about 11 weeks after conception, while the baby is still in mother’s womb

– Yawn lasts about 6 seconds on an average

– 55% of people yawn within 5 minutes when they see or hear someone yawn and the remaining people will be at least tempted to yawn

– Our heart rate can rise up to 30% while yawning

Wondering how many times I yawned while writing this post? Just 8 times! I guarantee you will yawn at least once after reading this post on Why do we yawn.

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